There seems to be two things that users of the X/M 32 mixers get tripped up on. Routing, and hooking up their wireless devices. While setting up your wireless router can be a very complex process, I am going to try and break down this process that should get you up and running in no time.

If you want to go further down this complex rabbit hole, I highly recommend you check out the free training offered by Dante, that will cover this process in great detail. If you are using a Dante Card on your mixer, you need to invest your time in their training.

One of the most common IP addresses for Home networks is 192.168.1.1. The most common subnet mask used on computers is 255.255.255.0. So why do we want to use a Static IP address for our mixers instead of using the DHCP function? While either method will work, the DCHP method can change your IP address, simply by turning your router on and off, where a Static IP address will only change when you change it manually.

While this procedure can be done withing the mixer, it can also be done within your router. Due to the fact there are 100’s of available routers on the market in 2022, it is impossible for me to address all of these routers. However, you should be able to find this information for your particular router on-line, in the instruction manual or possibly on YouTube.

There are a few things we need to take into consideration. One of the mist important things to consider, is making sure your mixer has its own dedicated router that IS NOT connected to the internet. By doing this, you are creating your own private network.

So we are going to be going over how to assign a static IP Address using the X/M 32 Mixers. Turn on your mixer and go to Setup > Network Settings. In the bottom left you will see DHCP. If it is grayed out, it is disconnected. If it is lit up, it is active. The first encoder knob can be depressed to turn the DHCP function on and off. Make sure it is grayed out and do the following steps in the order they are listed.

  1. Rotate the first encoder knob in till the top four boxes under IP Address is highlighted.

  2. Rotate the second encoder knob in till it shows 192.

  3. Rotate the third encoder knob in till it shows 168.

  4. Rotate the forth encoder knob in till it shows 1.

  5. Rotate the fifth encoder knob in till it shows 104.

The IP Address should now show 192.168.1.104.

  1. Go back to the first encoder and WITHOUT depressing it, rotate it in till the Subnet Mask is highlighted.

  2. Rotate the second encoder knob in till it shows 255.

  3. Rotate the third encoder knob in till it shows 255.

  4. Rotate the forth encoder knob in till it shows 255.

  5. Rotate the fifth encoder knob in till it shows 0.

The Subnet Mask should now show 255.255.255.0

  1. Go back to the first encoder and WITHOUT depressing it, rotate it in till the Gateway is highlighted.

  2. Rotate the second encoder knob in till it shows 192.

  3. Rotate the third encoder knob in till it shows 168.

  4. Rotate the forth encoder knob in till it shows 1.

  5. Rotate the fifth encoder knob in till it shows 1.

The Gateway should now show 192.168.1.1. There are many times where you do not need to use the Gateway settings, but if you do have a problem setting your Static IP Address, I wanted to include this step.

  1. GO TO THE SIXTH ENCODER AND DEPRESS IT TO ASSIGN THESE SETTINGS.

As you can see by the picture below, since most Consumer Grade IP Addresses are in the 192.168.1.x range, and the most common Subnet is 255.255.255.0, we now have hundreds of IP Addresses we can choose from. As you can see from the picture, my laptop using X32 Edit, it has a static Mac IP Address 192.168.1.131.

Since we have a Static IP Address of 192.168.1.104 assigned to our mixer, any number assigned to the forth slot, the one after the third (.) period, should always work as long as it is at least one digit or more off from the static IP Address of our mixer.

In other words, if we have 192.168.1.131 assigned to our mixer and 192.168.1.131 assigned to our computer, iPad, iPhone or Tablet, this WILL NOT WORK because it is the same number for both devices.

However, if we have 192.168.1.131 assigned to our mixer and 192.168.1.133 assigned to our iPad, 192.168.1.134 assigned to our iPhone and 192.168.1.135 assigned to our Tablet, and our computer has a static Mac IP Address 192.168.1.131, then ALL of our devices we want to add to our network should work just fine,  because all these numbers are within the proper range and they are all off  by one or more digits from each other on the last slot!

This same application is how you configure your Praise and Worship Teams, Bands, Groups or any other situations where you may be using a program or app, to control your mixers, In Ear or stage monitors.

There is a lot of misleading information on the internet about hiding your IP Address. This will do you no good at all. While you may have it hidden, regardless if 20 or 2,000 people walk into your event, every smartphone, IPad or Tablet will start pinging your router trying to join. That is why it is critical you have your router setup properly.

Consumer and Professional grade wireless router uses radio frequencies to transmit information to your WiFi-connected devices like smartphones, laptops, tablets and more. The difference between 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz WiFi comes down to speed and range. Most people in audio will use 5 GHz because it is less crowed and will transmit more date, but it is less likely to penetrate though solid objects such as walls and has a shorter distance for transmitting data.

That is why you need to have your router as high as you can get it and as close to your devices as possible. You should also have it turned on 10 to 20 minuets before your event starts. This will allow your router to reject all these request mentioned above, settle down and do the job it is intended to do.

At this time using these same instructions, I have had the same static IP Address on my X32 Rack for over 5 years and I have yet to experience any issues whatsoever with any device I needed to connect into my private network, or suffered from any drop outs for the devices connected to it. You can download and print this article by clicking here. I hope this helps. Dana Tucker.